Corporations don't seem to understand Indigenous jurisdiction Alexander Joseph from the Babine Lake First Nation joins supporters of the Unist'ot'en camp and Wet'suwet'en First Nation as they gather at a camp fire off a logging road near Houston, B.C., on Jan. 9, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito D.T. Cochrane, York University, Canada Indigenous jurisdiction is at the centre of the dispute over the Coastal GasLink pipeline. The same is true of the Trans Mountain expansion. In both cases, the corporations involved have misunderstood or misrepresented the risks associated with jurisdictional uncertainty.  

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The MCC Carbon Clock shows how much CO2 can be released into the atmosphere to limit global warming to a maximum of 1.5°C and 2°C, respectively. With just a few clicks, you can compare the estimates for both temperature targets and see how much time is left in each scenario.  

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  July 9, 2019, Vancouver, Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Territories: Several First Nations officially launched their appeals of the recent re-approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and Tanker Expansion Project (TMX) today. If successful, these legal challenges could once again stop the project in its tracks by quashing or nullifying the approval, announced on June 18th by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.The First Nations applicants’ traditional territories cover virtually all of the pipeline’s route in BC.

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Just about one year ago, ten thousand people marched behind Grand Chief Stewart Phillip and Indigenous leaders from across Turtle Island to make concrete our commitment to stop the disastrous Trans Mountain pipeline and tanker project. 

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  “Unfortunately, the NEB repeated many of the same errors that landed the government in court last time,” said Rueben George, spokesperson for Tsleil-Waututh Nation’s Sacred Trust Initiative. “The ridiculously short timeline, the limited scope of the review, and limited testing of evidence made this re-do even worse than the first hearing.”

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(Coast Salish Territory/Vancouver, B.C. – January 10, 2019) Yesterday Premier John Horgan provided insufficient and inappropriate comments regarding the ongoing conflict in Wet’suwet’en territory. The Premier took a minimum approach to acceptable provincial standards for engagement with Indigenous peoples, in direct conflict with his government’s commitments to full implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UN Declaration).

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(December 12, 2018) Despite the 2014 oil price crash and the ongoing hand-wringing over pipelines and the price of Canadian heavy oil, a new study from the Corporate Mapping Project shows the reality is that the Big Five oil sands producers have remained incredibly profitable corporations. The study, released in November by the Parkland Institute and Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – BC Office, finds that Suncor, CNRL, Cenovus, Imperial, and Husky banked or paid out to shareholders a total of $13.5 billion last year alone. These big five oil sands corporations produce 80% of Canada’s bitumen.

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Federal Government Must Double Climate Targets And Curtail Oil Expansion To Limit to 1.5° Katowice, Poland—A new report released today at COP 24 shows oil and gas emissions in Canada are rising and that oil and gas companies in Canada are systematically weakening and delaying Canada’s climate plan and further climate ambition while reaping more federal subsidies and continuing to increase oil production.

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