The global campaign is targeting Liberty Mutual and remaining insurers of the tar sands pipeline that runs from Edmonton, Alberta to Burnaby, BC, crossing dozens of Indigenous territories without consent. The Trans Mountain pipeline was constructed in 1953, when Indigenous people were forbidden to hire lawyers or or bring about land claims against the government without the government's consent.

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“The federal government investigating itself is clearly not an option,” said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip.

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Corporations don't seem to understand Indigenous jurisdiction Alexander Joseph from the Babine Lake First Nation joins supporters of the Unist'ot'en camp and Wet'suwet'en First Nation as they gather at a camp fire off a logging road near Houston, B.C., on Jan. 9, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito D.T. Cochrane, York University, Canada Indigenous jurisdiction is at the centre of the dispute over the Coastal GasLink pipeline. The same is true of the Trans Mountain expansion. In both cases, the corporations involved have misunderstood or misrepresented the risks associated with jurisdictional uncertainty.  

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The MCC Carbon Clock shows how much CO2 can be released into the atmosphere to limit global warming to a maximum of 1.5°C and 2°C, respectively. With just a few clicks, you can compare the estimates for both temperature targets and see how much time is left in each scenario.  

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  July 9, 2019, Vancouver, Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Territories: Several First Nations officially launched their appeals of the recent re-approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and Tanker Expansion Project (TMX) today. If successful, these legal challenges could once again stop the project in its tracks by quashing or nullifying the approval, announced on June 18th by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.The First Nations applicants’ traditional territories cover virtually all of the pipeline’s route in BC.

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